Greek Goddess Names – The List of Greek Goddesses/Deities in Mythology

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Are you a fan of Greek mythology ? Or perhaps you are merely interested in Greek goddess names ? In any case, you will surely find what you are looking for in this post. Without further ado, here is our extensive list of Greek goddesses/deities in mythology:

Achelois

Achelois was one of the minor Greek goddesses of the ancient times. She was a moon goddess worshipped by Greeks for her help in curing diseases.

Her name means “she who washes away pain”. On an interesting side note, the word “achelois” is also considered by some to be the surname of the Sirens, fathered by the river god Achelous. 

Greek poet Tzetses claimed Achelois was one of the seven muses who inspired art, science and literature.

Alcyone

Alcyone was one of the seven daughters of Titan Atlas and the ocean nymph Pleione also known as Pleaiades sisters.

Known as a moon goddesss just like Achelois, Alcyone was also the goddess of sea and tranquility. The word “Alcyone” means “kingfisher”.

Alectrona

Alectrona/Electryone/Electryo was the goddess of sun in Greek mythology. Fathered by Helios and mothred by Rhodos, she was worshipped in Rhodes Island mostly.

According to the myth, she was in love with Apollo and died as a virgin being killed by Hades, the god of the underworld, during Trojan War.

Amphitrite

Poseiodon’s wife, Amphitrite was the goddess and the queen of the sea and fish and the oldest one among the fifty daughters of Nereus also known as Nereies. She is considered to be the same figure as the early sea goddess Thalassa.

Antheia

Antheia/Anthea was the Greek goddess of flowers and gardens and one of the Charites/Graces in Greek mythology.

Apate

Fathered by the personification of darkness, Erebos, and mothered by the primordial goddess and personification of night, Nyx, Apate was the goddess/spirit/demon of deceit, guile and trickery in Greek mythology.

Aphaea

Aphaea/Aphaia was a Greek goddess of ancient times who was also identified with the nymph Britomartis. She was known to be made a goddess by her close friend Artemis. She was exclusively worshipped in a temple built in her name on the island of Aegina by Cretans and Aeginetans. Cretans call her Dictynna.

Aphrodite

One of the major deities in Greek mythology, Aphrodite was the goddess of beauty, love, procreation, pleasure and passion. She was the dauıghter of Zeus and Dione although Hesiod claimed her father was Uranus and she was born out of the sea foam ( the word “aphro” means sea foam in Greek language) when Cronus castrated his father Uranus and threw his genitals in to the sea.

She had many children from her several consorts including Dionysus, Ares, Poseidon, Zeus and Hephaestus.

Artemis

Artemis was the goddess of the moon, chastity, hunting and wild life in Greek mythology and the twin sister of the god Apollo. Her father was Zeus and her mother was Leto.

Along with Apollo, Artemis was known to be the bringer of disease and sudden death with the two gods targeting men and women, respectively.

She did not have any children as she was one of the virgin goddesses in Greek mythology. Also known as the defender of purity and the goddess of chastity, she was believed to protect the purity of her worshippers as well.

Astraea

Astraea/Astrea/Astria was the goddess of justice and innocence in Greek mythology. She was the daughter of Titans Astraeus, known as the god of dusk and Eos, known as the goddess of dawn. Other names associated with hbeing her father and mother are Zeus and Themis.

The word Astraea means can be interpreted to mean “starry night” or “star-maiden”.

Ate

Ate was the goddess/spirit of mischief, infatuation, delusion and ruin in Greek mythology. She was believed to lead men to ruin their lives. She was said to be the daughter of Eris, the goddess of strife, who according to some accounts, was herself the daughter Zeus.

Athena

Athena/Athene was the Greek goddess of war, wisdom, courage, strategy, strength, pottery and art.

Athena was one of the most prominent Olympian gods and she is involved in many Greek myths. For instance, she took part in the Trojan War and defeated Ares, the god of war. Therefore we highly recommend you to read our detailed article on Athena by clicking the link below:

Atropos

Atropos, also known as Aisa, was the oldest one of the Three Fates (Moirai) in Greek mythology She was known as the goddess of destiny and fate.

The word “Atropos” means irreversible/unalterable in Greek language. According to the belief she was the Fate that finalized the decisions of her sisters Lachesis and Clotho in an irreversible way.

Bia

Bia was the mythological Titan goddess /spirit of raw power, force, might, physical strength and compulsion. She was fathered and mothered by Titans Pallas and Styx respectively, and the sister of Kratos, Zelus and Nike.

Brizo

Brizo was the Greek goddess who was believed to be the protector of sailors and fishermen. According to the belief, she also had the ability to interpret dreams like a prophet.

Calliope

As another name on our list of Greek goddess names, Calliope was the goddess of poetry, epics and eloquence and one of the nine Muses (the Mousai) in Greek mythology.

Her name is derived from two Greek words “kallos” and “ops” and means “the one with the beautiful voice”.

Calypso

Calypso was a water-nymph/goddess in Greek mythology and was the daughter of Titan Atlas (as the most common belief). She lived on the island of Ogygia where she held Odysseus captive for many years in Homer’s Odyssey

Celaeno

Celaeno/Kelaino was a goddess and one of the seven nymphs called Pleiades in Greek mythology. She was one of the consorts of Poseidon and had two children from him: Lycus and Eurypylus.

Ceto

Ceto/Crataeis was the primordial goddess of sea in Greek mythology and the daughter of Pontus and Gaia. She was also the mother of some of the most significant monsters in Greek myths such as Echidna, Gorgon, Graeae, Ladon, Thoösa and Hesperides.

Circe

Circe/Kirke was the goddess of magic, sorcery, necromancy and illusion. She had the ability to transform humans into other creatures. If you read Homer’s Odyssey, you might remember her turning Odysseus’ men into pigs.

Clotho

Clotho was the youngest one of the Three Fates (the Moirai) and a goddess in Greek mythology. Among the Fates, she was the one responsible for “spinning the fate of human beings”.

Cybele

Cybele/Kybele was an ancient, primordial goddess of nature, mountains, wild life and fertility largely worshiped in Anatolia. In time, she was identified with Rhea in Greek myths.

Demeter

Demeter was the goddess of harvest, bread, fertility and agriculture who was responsible with providing mankind with sustenance through nature. She was also the mother of Persephone as you can remember from the myth regarding the abduction of Persephone by the god of the underworld, Hades.

Eileithyia

Fathered by Olympian gods Zeus and Hera, Eileithyia was the goddess of childbirth in Greek mythology. The word “Eileithyia” is interpreted to mean either “relieve(r)” or “the one who comes for help”.

Electra

Daughter of Titan Atlas and the ocean-nymph Pleione, Electra was a star-nymph (Pleiad) and a goddess in Greek myths.

She gave birth to two sons, Dardanos, the ancestor of the royal family of Troy, and Iasion both of whom were fathered by Zeus.

Elpis

Elpis was the spirit/goddess of hope. According to the myth, along with some other spirits, Elpis was captured in a jar by Zeus and given to Pandora, the first woman.

After Pandora opened the jar, all the spirits escaped but Elpis. She stayed for the good of the mankind to give them hope.

Enyo

The daughter of Zeus and Hera, Enyo was a spirit/minor goddess of war who was known to be the counterpart and the companion of the god of war, Ares.

In some accounts she is mentioned as the sister, wife or even the mother of Ares. She was also known as “the sister of War”. One a side note, Homer identified her with the goddess of strife, Eris.

Eos

Fathered by Hyperion and mothered by Thea, Eos was the Titan goddess of dawn.

Erato

The daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne, Erato was the goddess of mime and erotic poetry and one of the nine Muses (the Mousai). The word “Erato” means “lovely” or “beloved” in Greek language.

Eris

Eris was the spirit/goddess of discord, rivalry and strife in Greek mythology. She was the daughter of the goddess of the night, Nyx, but there are no accounts associating a name with her father.

The word “Eris” means “strife” in Greek language and is the counterpart of “discordia” in Latin, meaning “discord”.

Euterpe

Euterpe was one of the nine Muses and the goddess of music and lyric poetry.

Gaia

As one of the most important goddesses in our list of Greek goddess names, if not the most important, Gaia was the primordial goddess of life and earth.

Being one of “protogenoi”, the primordial elemental deities, Gaia came into existence at the time of creation and was known as the mother of all creatures.

She gave birth to Titans and the Giants from Uranus (the god of sky), who was believed to be both her son and husband, and the primordial sea gods from Pontus (the god of sea).

Gaia was a prominent figure in many myths and battles featuring the Titans and the Olympian gods. That is why you might want to read our detailed post about her by clicking below:

Harmonia

Daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, Harmonia was the goddess of concord and harmony as you can imagine from the name. She was the opposite figure of Eris, the goddess of discord in Greek mythology.

On a side note, in Argonautica, Apollonius mentions that Ares fell in love with a nymph named Harmonia known as the nymph of Akmonian Wood while in most accounts she is told to be Aphrodite’s daughter from her affair with Ares, the god of war.

Hebe

The next name in our list of Greek goddesses is Hebe, the daughter of Zeus and Hera. Hebe was the goddess of brides and youth. Hebe’s counterpart in Roman mythology was Juventas.

Hecate

Now, we move on to one of the more interesting characters in Greek mythology, Hecate, the daughter of Perses and Asteria.

Hecate was the Greek goddess of necromancy, moon, ghosts, the night, wit-craft and magic. While some mythologists suggest that the name Hecate was derived from the Greek word “hekatos” meaning “the one who works from afar” others believe it might be derived from the word “hekṓn” in Greek language meaning “willing” to be interpreted as “the one who works her will”.

We wrote a detailed post about Hecate, the goddess of the night, magic and witchcraft, you can read it by clicking below:

Hemera

Daughter of Erebus, the god of darkness and Nyx, the goddess of the night, Hemera was one of the Protogenoi/protogenos, the primordial deities in Greek mythology known as the goddess of the day.

She was identified with Eos and Hera and her counterpart in Roman mythology was Dies.

Hera

As one of the most important Greek goddess names in our list, Hera, also known as the Queen of Gods, was the Greek goddess of women, marriage, the stars and the sky (heavens).

Her father and mother were the Titans Cronus and Rhea, respectively and she was married to Zeus who was also her brother.

She also mothered many important figures in Greek mythology and got closely involved with the affairs of mankind such as the Trojan War. That is why we suggest you read our detailed article about Hera by clicking below:

Hestia

The first child of Titans Cronus and Rhea, Hestia was the virgin Greek goddess of the home and the hearth (not “heart”, mind you). Her Roman counterpart in mythology is Vesta. You can read more about Hestia below:

Hygieia

Hygieia/Hygeia/Hygiea was the goddess of cleanliness, health and hygiene. She was one of the daughters of the god of medicine, Asclepius/Asklepios. Her symbol was a snake/serpent and her counterpart in Roman mythology was Salus.

Iris

Daughter of Thaumas and Electra, also known as the messenger of Olympians, Iris was the goddess of the rainbow, the sea and the sky. Iris’ symbol was a herald’s wand and her Roman counterpart was Arcus.

Keres

The name Keres does not define a single goddess but several goddesses/spirits who were the daughters of Nyx, the goddess of the night.

Keres were known as the goddesses of cruel, violent and bloody deaths. Their counterpart in Roman mythology is Tenebrae.

Kotys

Kotys/Cotys/Cottyto was the Greek goddess of wilds worshiped by the Edoni, people who lived in Thracia and by people of Corinth. She was identified by some experts with another goddess named Bendis.

Lachesis

Daughter of Zeus and Themis, Lachesis is the next Fate in our list. Being one of the three Moirai(Fates) in Greek mythology along with her sisters Atropos and Clotho, Lachesis was another goddess of fate and destiny.

She was the Fate responsible for measuring how long any being on earth would live. Fatum, Fatae and Parcae are the Roman names used for Lachesis.

Maia

One of the seven daughters of Titan Atlas and the ocean nymph Pleione known as the Pleiades, Maia was the goddess of nursing mothers. She secretly gave birth to Hermes from Zeus in a cave in Arkadia and also took care of Arcas, the son of Callisto, who was turned into a bear.

Maniae

Maniae/Maniai were the spirits/goddesses of frenzy, insanity and madness in Greek mythology.

Melpomene

Fathered by Zeus and mothered by Mnemosyne, Melpomene was one of the nine Muses(Mousai). She was the Muse/goddess of tragedy and her symbol is the tragic mask.

Merope

Merope was one of the seven star-nymphs (Pleiades), the daughters of Atlas and Pleione and the wife of King Sisyphus/Sisyphos.

Metis

Daughter of Titans Oceanus and Tethys, Metis was the Titan goddess of wisdom, wise counsel, cunning and planning. She helped Zeus devise a plan to make Cronus throw up the children of his ( Zeus’ siblings) he devoured.

Nemesis

Nemesis was the Greek goddess of retribution who was known to provide it against the people who disrespected gods or did evil deeds. She was the daughter of Nyx and although most accounts do not tell of her father, some suggest that Oceanus was her father.

Nemesis’ symbols were a lash and a sword and her Roman counterpart was Rivalitas.

Nike

Daughter of Titan Pallas and Styx, the goddess and the river that separates the Underworld from the Earth in Greek mythology, Nike was the goddess of victory.

She was represented with a palm branch or by wings as she was mostly described as “the winged goddess”. Nike’s counterpart in Roman mythology is Victoria.

Nyx

Mothered by Chaos/Khaos, the first primordial deity, with no father, Nyx was the goddess of the night in Greek mythology.

She was also the mother of important figures such as Aether, the Hesperides, Hemera, Moros, Apate, Dolos, Nemesis, Momus, the Keres, the Moirai, Oizys, the Oneiroi, Thanatos, Philotes, Geras, Eris and Hypnos.

Her Roman counterpart is Nox.

Peitho

Daughter of Titans Oceanus and Tethys, Peitho was the spirit/goddess of seduction, charming speech and persuasion in Greek mythology.

Her symbol is a ball of twine while her counterpart in Roman mythology is Suada.

Persephone

As another major figure in our list of Greek goddess names, Persephone was the daughter of Zeus and Demeter and the goddess of the underworld, vegetation, spring and flowers.

According to the myth, she was abducted and raped by Hades, the god of the underworld and her mother Demeter refused to let anything grow on earth until Persephone is returned from the underworld. That is why the springtime was believed to be the time Persephone returned from the underworld while the wintertime marked her return to the underworld.

Persephone’s symbol is a torch and she was also known as Core while her counterpart in Roman myths is Proserpina.

If you would like to read more about Persephone, kindly check our post below:

Pheme

As one of the daughters of Gaea, the Mother of All also known as the Mother Earth, Pheme was the spirit/goddess of gossip and rumor in Greek mythology. Pheme was sometimes called Ossa and her counterpart in Roman myths is Fama.

Polyhymnia

One of the nine Muses (Mousai), Polyhymnia/Polymnia was the goddess of hymns, dance, music and songs.

Rhea

Daughter of Uranus and Gaea, Rhea was the Titan goddess of motherhood, fertility and mountains. Also known as the Queen of Heaven and the Mother of Gods, Rhea was both the wife and the sister of Cronus.

Rhea’s symbols were cymbals and turret crowns. Her Roman counterpart is Ops/Opis.

Selene

Daughter of Thea and Hyperion, Selene was the Titan goddess of the moon. She is also known as the mother of vampires as some more modern myths connect her with the origin of vampires.

Selene’s symbol were bull horns and crescent. Her roman counterpart is Luna.

Sterope

As another one of the Pleiades, the star-nymphs fathered and mothered by Titan Atlas and the Oceanid nymph Pleione, respectively, Sterope/Asterope was a minor deity in Greek myths.

Styx

Daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, Styx was both the legendary river that separates the Earth and the Underworld and the goddess of oaths and rivers.

Taygete

One of seven star-nymphs, the daughters of Atlas and Pleione, Taygete is another minor goddess in Greek myths. She is also known as a mountain nymph.

On a side note, she was one of the consorts of Zeus and gave him a son named Lacedaemon/Lakedaimon who is believed to be an ancestor to the Spartan kings.

Terpischore

As another one of the nine Muses, Terpsichore/Terpsikhore was the goddess/muse of dance and choral songs.

Her symbols are plectrum and lyre.

Thalia

Thalia/Thaelia is another one of the nine Muses in Greek mythology fathered by Zeus and mothered by Mnemosyne. She was known as the muse/goddess of bucolic poetry and comedy.

Her symbol is the comic mask.

The Erinyes

The next name in our list of Greek goddesses is the Erinyes, also known as Eumenides and the Furies in Greek mythology.

Named Alecto, Megaera and Tisiphone, the three Furies were the goddesses of revenge and retribution.

They lived in and served the king and the queen of the underworld, namely, Hades and Persephone.

The symbol of the Erinyes is vipers/serpents and their counterpart in Roman mythology is Furiae and Dirae.

The Graces/Charites

Three Charites/Kharites, also known as the Graces, were the goddesses of joy, fertility, dance, songs, adornment, beauty, human creativity and grace in Greek mythology.

The Greek word for Charite is “Charis” and while most accounts had the names of the Charites as Aegle, Thalia and Euphrosyne, in some accounts Charis was mentioned to be the third Grace instead of Thalia.

The Muses

The nine Muses, also known as the Moisai, were nine goddesses of art, poetry, music, dance, songs, epics, history, astronomy, comedy, tragedy, hymns, lyric and erotic poetry. They were the daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne.

While Urania (Ourania) was assigned to astronomy, Thalia (Thaleia) was assigned to comedy, Polyhymnia (Polymnia) to religious hymns, Terpsichore (Terpsikhore) to dance and choral songs, Euterpe to lyric poetry, Erato to erotic poetry, Clio (Kleio) to history, Melpomene to tragedy and Calliope (Kalliope) to epic poetry.

The Muses are represented by citharas, flutes or lyres. Their counterpart in Roman myths is Musae.

Themis

Another one of the daughters of Uranus and Gaea, Titaness Themis was the goddess of oracles, assemblies, order, custom and divine law.

She was married to Zeus and was known to be an advisor to him as sometimes depicted in the artworks of ancient Greece.

Themis’ symbol is a tripod.

Thetis

Daughter of Nereus and Doris, Thetis was the goddess of sea and water.

It should be noted, at this point, that Thetis should not be confused with Tethys the Titaness, Uranus and Gaia’s daughter. In some accounts, Tethys was actually considered to be the goddess Thetis’ grandmother.

Tyche

Daughter of Titans Oceanus and Tethys, Tyche was the Greek goddess of luck, fortune, chance and fate.

Tyche’s symbols are rudder and cornucopia and her counterpart in Roman mythology is Fortuna.

Urania

The last name on our list of Greek goddesses is Urania/Ourania, the daughter of Zeus and Mnemosyne.

As one of the nine Muses, Urania was the Greek goddess of astronomy. Her symbols are rods and celestial globes.

The vast world of Greek mythology is full of interesting female characters. Here in this extensive list of Greek goddess names, we tried to introduce you to both major and minor goddesses. Hope you liked the article, please share it if you did, many thanks!